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The effects of supplementation of vitamin E on immune senescence

Bakker, J (2012) The effects of supplementation of vitamin E on immune senescence. Bachelor's Thesis, Biology.

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Abstract

Immune senescence is the deterioration of both the adaptive and the innate immune system with increasing age. This leads to a higher incidence of infections and auto-immune diseases and lower efficiency of vaccination in aged individuals. There is no consensus yet whether nutrition or nutritional supplements can positively affect immune senescence. The effects of supplementation of vitamin E on immune senescence are assessed in this article. Vitamin E has been reported to influence immune responses in the elderly. In addition, promising results have shown that vitamin E might stimulate the immune response to infections and autoimmune diseases and might enhance the efficacy of vaccinations. Mechanistically, vitamin E might stimulate aged T cells directly by various mechanisms or indirectly by inhibiting prostaglandin (PG)E2 production by macrophages, which might lead to improved immune responses to infections and vaccinations. In addition, vitamin E, as a lipid-soluble antioxidant, might delay the onset of or improve the development of auto-immune diseases by preventing damage from reactive oxygen species (ROS). More research is needed to investigate the effects of vitamin E supplementation to healthy elderly. Future studies should focus on elucidating the mechanisms of vitamin E and identifying responsive subgroups, optimal vitamin E dose and potential adverse effects of long-term supplementation.

Item Type: Thesis (Bachelor's Thesis)
Degree programme: Biology
Thesis type: Bachelor's Thesis
Language: English
Date Deposited: 15 Feb 2018 07:49
Last Modified: 15 Feb 2018 07:49
URI: http://fse.studenttheses.ub.rug.nl/id/eprint/10303

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