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The meaning of fever rhythmicity and its relation to the timing of Plasmodium reproductive cycles during malaria infections.

Drunen, J.J.E. van (2012) The meaning of fever rhythmicity and its relation to the timing of Plasmodium reproductive cycles during malaria infections. Bachelor's Thesis, Biology.

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Abstract

Malaria is an infectious disease caused by parasites of the genus Plasmodium, mainly found in tropical regions. The parasites are transferred via mosquito bites and infect vertebrates, including humans. Symptoms arise 8 - 30 days after infection and are very similar to those of common infections, including headaches, fever and nausea. Clinical deterioration usually appears 3–7 days after onset of the fever. Complications include coma (cerebral malaria), organ failure, pulmonary oedema, metabolic acidosis and hypoglycemia (Trampuz et al., 2003). Although most of the (early) symptoms are not unique to malaria infections, its rhythmic fever is a well-known symptom. The period of fever cycles varies between species, but it’s always a multiple of 24 hours. It has been well documented that the fever cycle is closely linked to the developmental cycle of the infecting parasite. Current treatment consists of combinations of artiseminin based medicine and often fever treatment (paracetamol or ibuprofen). Several studies after the 90s show that the effectivity of different treatments differs per developmental stage, suggesting that chronotherapy (timed treatment of medicine based on the peak of affectivity) could be a viable option.

Item Type: Thesis (Bachelor's Thesis)
Degree programme: Biology
Thesis type: Bachelor's Thesis
Language: English
Date Deposited: 15 Feb 2018 07:50
Last Modified: 15 Feb 2018 07:50
URI: http://fse.studenttheses.ub.rug.nl/id/eprint/10468

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