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Essay: Potential antimicrobial agents for the treatment of MDR-TB

Alsaad. N., (2012) Essay: Potential antimicrobial agents for the treatment of MDR-TB. Master's Thesis / Essay, Biology.

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Abstract

Treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is challenging because of the high toxicity and poor efficacy of second-line drugs. Therefore new anti-TB drugs are urgently needed. Unfortunately, development of new drugs takes time, is difficult and expensive. In order to speed up novel treatments for MDR-TB, we suggest considering expanding the indications of already available drugs. Six drugs with antimicrobial activity (phenothiazines, metronidazole, doxycycline, disulfiram, tigecycline and co-trimoxazole) are not listed in WHO guidelines on MDR-TB treatment but could be potential candidates for evaluation against M. tuberculosis. We reviewed in vitro, in vivo and clinical anti-TB activity of these drugs in addition to the pharmacokinetics (PK) and side effects. We discussed the potential role of these drugs for treatment of MDR-TB. Of the drugs effective against active replicating TB, co-trimoxazole seems the most promising one because of its consistent pharmacokinetic profile, easy penetration into epithelial lining fluid (ELF) and its safety profile. For the more challenging dormant state of TB, thioridazine may play a potential role as an adjuvant for treatment of MDR-TB. A strategy consisting of PK/PD studies, dose finding and phase III studies is needed to explore these drugs further for their potential role in the treatment of MDR-TB.

Item Type: Thesis (Master's Thesis / Essay)
Degree programme: Biology
Thesis type: Master's Thesis / Essay
Language: English
Date Deposited: 15 Feb 2018 07:52
Last Modified: 15 Feb 2018 07:52
URI: http://fse.studenttheses.ub.rug.nl/id/eprint/10871

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