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Research Report 2: A short heat wave causes a shift in bacterial composition in Stauroneis constricta monocultures

Vries, P. de and Boer, M.K. de and Piquet, A.M.T. and Boele-Bos, S. A. and Eriksson, B.D.H.K. (2013) Research Report 2: A short heat wave causes a shift in bacterial composition in Stauroneis constricta monocultures. Master's Thesis / Essay, Biology.

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Abstract

Increasing temperatures cause physiological responses of species populations and thereby change species interactions across and within trophic levels. In marine environments, heat stress can alter algal metabolism, change micro algal community structures and increase bacterial activity. In this study we investigated the effect of a short realistic heat wave of 26 days on monocultures of the diatom Stauroneis constricta, one of the dominant producers of the Western Baltic Sea coastal area, and its associated bacteria. Biomass, EPS and bacteria samples were taken during and after the heat wave with a maximal recovery time of 30 days. S. constricta total biovolume decreased significantly during the heat wave while bacterial numbers increased. After the heat wave, algal total biovolume slowly increased but pre-heat wave values were never recovered. Bacterial communities in both heat wave and control treatment changed over time. Out of five identified species, two disappeared during the heat wave treatment (Sulfitobacter sp. DG885 and Limnobacter litoralis KPI-23/18/19) and were not found in the successive sampling times, indicating that the heat wave caused an established shift in bacterial dominance.

Item Type: Thesis (Master's Thesis / Essay)
Degree programme: Biology
Thesis type: Master's Thesis / Essay
Language: English
Date Deposited: 15 Feb 2018 07:52
Last Modified: 15 Feb 2018 07:52
URI: http://fse.studenttheses.ub.rug.nl/id/eprint/10962

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