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Alzheimer's disease, neuroinflammation and the influence of different combinations of nutrients

Olst, L. van (2013) Alzheimer's disease, neuroinflammation and the influence of different combinations of nutrients. Bachelor's Thesis, Biology.

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Abstract

Neuroinflammation has shown to play an important role in AD. Nowadays an increasing number of researchers are naming chronic neuroinflammation, manifesting in activated glial cells, as the main component exacerbating AD. Various investigations have shown the effect of nutritional components on certain elements of the pro-inflammatory cascade of AD. For example, nutritional components are able to alter nuclear-factor κB (NF-κB) expression and inhibit pro-inflammatory cytokines. Prospective studies investigating the influence of whole food groups and dietary patterns on the onset of AD and/or its cognitive breakdown notably showed more promising results than epidemiological studies focussing on single nutrients. Previous pre-clinical trials have placed too much emphasis on a single nutrient approach, ignoring the importance of a whole diet wherein combined nutrients are able to enhance or catalyze each other. In conclusion, a combination of nutritional components is able to decrease neuroinflammation in AD thereby inhibiting its development. Therefore nutrition can be a ‘new’ focal point in the treatment of AD. However, it must be taken into account that nutrients may have additive or synergistic effects within and across a range of foods that build up a diet. A full-diet approach is most likely to benefit AD treatment and therefore should be further investigated.

Item Type: Thesis (Bachelor's Thesis)
Degree programme: Biology
Thesis type: Bachelor's Thesis
Language: English
Date Deposited: 15 Feb 2018 07:54
Last Modified: 15 Feb 2018 07:54
URI: http://fse.studenttheses.ub.rug.nl/id/eprint/11258

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