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Effect of molt on the homarid lobster’s life cycle

Goot, G. van der (2013) Effect of molt on the homarid lobster’s life cycle. Bachelor's Thesis, Biology.

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Abstract

The molt cycle influences a lobster’s life cycle in many ways, because a lobster is either preparing for ecdysis or recovering from it. There has been done a lot of research regarding this subject on the Homarid lobster, in order to understand and improve conservation. The molt cycle is divided in 5 major stages and several sub stages, which are used in this thesis and are adapted for Homarus americanus. The Homarid lobster undergoes a metamorphosis in the molt from the third to the fourth stage, it is now possible for the homarid lobster to settle on the ocean floor. For a better understanding of the mechanisms for molt, hormonal control has been intensively studied. The opinions differ and change due to new research. The mechanisms that cause molt and the internal changes ensure alterations in the homarid lobster’s behavior. Observations have shown that alteration in aggression and the escape response occur over the molt cycle. Behavioral changes are seen in the mating act as well during the molt cycle. Females are affected by molt, because receptivity peaks after ecdysis and fertilization is most likely to occur during this time. More recent studies have shown that females or not that reliant on their stage in the molt cycle as was once thought. Sperm can be stored and batches of eggs can be fertilized in multiple years. Male homarid lobster’s are affect by molt during the mating season through their dominance status. A dominant male loses his status when he molt, but this is regained several days afterwards. It is therefore not smart for a male to molt during the mating season, because females prefer dominant males.

Item Type: Thesis (Bachelor's Thesis)
Degree programme: Biology
Thesis type: Bachelor's Thesis
Language: English
Date Deposited: 15 Feb 2018 07:55
Last Modified: 15 Feb 2018 07:55
URI: http://fse.studenttheses.ub.rug.nl/id/eprint/11380

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