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Target genes for miR-150 and miR26 and their possible role in B-cell lymphomas; new drug targets for the future?

Zwier, S.H. (2013) Target genes for miR-150 and miR26 and their possible role in B-cell lymphomas; new drug targets for the future? Bachelor's Thesis, Biology.

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Abstract

B-cell lymphoma is a type of cancer that is difficult to completely cure. Therapy consists mainly of radiation and chemotherapy, and aims for bringing the cancer into remission. Several non-Hodgkin lymphomas are known. In this thesis the non-Hodgkin lymphomas diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, Burkitt lymphoma, acute lymphoblastic leukemia and B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia and Hodgkin lymphoma are discussed. As for most types of cancer, expression of certain genes is aberrant in B-cell lymphomas. One mechanism in which expression can be altered is by microRNAs (miRs). MiRs can bind to mRNA via the RISC complex and in this manner control gene expression (targeting). A lot of research is carried out to find miRs that target genes involved in cancer. In B-cell lymphomas also several expected targets and miRs are known. Two miRs, miR-150 and miR-26, are being discussed in this thesis. Their genes of interest are selected on the expected role they play in the development, prognosis and treatment of B-cell cancers. The most promising target genes show involvement in lymphocyte cancers, lymphomas and several cell mechanisms involved in cancer, as for example DNA damage response, apoptosis and cell proliferation. Therefore, these genes and their miRs are probably usefull for new therapy targets in the future.

Item Type: Thesis (Bachelor's Thesis)
Degree programme: Biology
Thesis type: Bachelor's Thesis
Language: English
Date Deposited: 15 Feb 2018 07:55
Last Modified: 15 Feb 2018 07:55
URI: http://fse.studenttheses.ub.rug.nl/id/eprint/11436

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