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Research Report 1 : Phenology and habitat selection of Black-tailed Godwits (Limosa limosa limosa) in south-west Friesland (the Netherlands)

Zwart, L. (2013) Research Report 1 : Phenology and habitat selection of Black-tailed Godwits (Limosa limosa limosa) in south-west Friesland (the Netherlands). Master's Thesis / Essay, Biology.

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Abstract

The population of continental Black-tailed Godwits, Limosa limosa limosa, has steadily declined since the 1980's. Agri-environment schemes (AES) have been implemented to stop the decline, but have proven ineffective. This study looks at habitat phenology and selection of Black-tailed Godwits during the breeding season in order to understand how agricultural management may affect their reproductive success. I studied Black-tailed Godwits in the Haanmeer, a small nature reserve in the north of the Netherlands and compared insect density, insect biomass, soil resistance, vegetation structure and earthworm abundance amongst management types. I found that monocultures have a higher soil resistance compared to herb-rich meadows. Differences in insect abundance and biomass were limited, however, with vegetation variables being a better explanation of the differences than weather variables. There was no difference in earthworm abundance between habitat types. Across most variables, differences between individual meadows were much larger than between habitat types. In conclusion, this suggests that soil resistance, and in turn water-levels, and vegetation structure are key characteristics of the habitat of Black-tailed Godwits.

Item Type: Thesis (Master's Thesis / Essay)
Degree programme: Biology
Thesis type: Master's Thesis / Essay
Language: English
Date Deposited: 15 Feb 2018 07:56
Last Modified: 15 Feb 2018 07:56
URI: http://fse.studenttheses.ub.rug.nl/id/eprint/11513

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