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Essay: The effects of physical exercise on neurodegeneration and cognitive decline. Which molecular pathways are involved?

Slagter, P and Zee, E.A. van der (2014) Essay: The effects of physical exercise on neurodegeneration and cognitive decline. Which molecular pathways are involved? Master's Thesis / Essay, Biology.

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Abstract

It is well known that physical exercise reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease, metabolic syndrome and obesity. Several studies have now shown that physical exercise also has a beneficial effect on cognitive impairment and dementia due to ageing and neurodegenerative diseases. However, exercise is a very broad term and most research that has been done focuses on different aspects of exercise. Since it is impossible to cover all these aspects in this thesis, I will focus on the effect of physical exercise in improving cognition and neuroprotection in elderly and in particular which molecular pathways are affected. Animal and human research show that by regulating the expression of several growth factors, including IGF-1, BDNF, VEGF and NGF, neurotransmitters and anti-inflammatory cytokines, exercise is capable of improving cognitive functions. However, the effect of exercise depends on duration, the sort of exercise that is performed and age. Also, not all cognitive processes improve to the same extent. Since most elderly are not capable of performing physical exercise, recent research has shifted towards the effects of whole body vibration on improving cognition as an alternative for physical exercise.

Item Type: Thesis (Master's Thesis / Essay)
Degree programme: Biology
Thesis type: Master's Thesis / Essay
Language: English
Date Deposited: 15 Feb 2018 07:56
Last Modified: 15 Feb 2018 07:56
URI: http://fse.studenttheses.ub.rug.nl/id/eprint/11591

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