Javascript must be enabled for the correct page display

The impact of different diet compositions and caloric restriction on colon cancer probability in aged mice

Dijkstra, D.J. (2014) The impact of different diet compositions and caloric restriction on colon cancer probability in aged mice. Master's Thesis / Essay, Biology.

[img]
Preview
Text
MasterLS_BMS_2014_DJDijkstra.pdf - Published Version

Download (3MB) | Preview
[img] Text
akkoord_DijkstraDJ.pdf - Other
Restricted to Repository staff only

Download (94kB)

Abstract

Colorectal cancer incidence is epidemiologically related to a western life style. Since randomized controlled trials in human are lacking, the exact causes remain uncertain. To examine the impact of diet quality and quantity on colon carcinogenesis, colons of 24 month old C57Bl/6J mice were obtained from a systems biology project. The mice received either a high fat ad libitum (HFAL), low fat ad libitum (LFAL) or low fat calorie restricted (LFCR) diet during their entire life time. The colons were fixed, embedded in paraffin, sliced and stained with hematoxylin & eosin (HE), CD45 and β catenin. The inflammation foci were quantified. Body weights of these mice and body weights, fat mass, insulin and glucose measurements of mice housed under the same conditions were obtained from the project. Body weight, relative total fat mass and relative visceral fat mass did not differ between LFAL and HFAL but did significantly differ between LFAL and LFCR. Glucose and insulin measurements were significantly different between LFAL and LFCR, but not between LFAL and HFAL. No carcinogenesis was found. Inflammation foci were detected and quantified in HE staining, using the CD45 staining as a confirmation. The number of foci was significantly different between LFAL and LFCR, but not between LFAL and HFAL. The mean foci size and summed total of all foci in an animal did not show differences. Alterations in β-catenin levels or localization were not visible. Remarkable large foci, expressing a lymphoid structure, were seen. More HFAL animals and less LFCR animals had these foci, both compared to LFAL. Based on literature, insulin resistance and inflammation are the major factors linking diet to colon carcinogenesis. Regarding to these factors, the results show LFCR versus LFAL differences but no HFAL versus LFAL differences. In adipose tissue, an important regulator of both insulin resistance and inflammation, differences were also only found between LFCR and LFAL. Although the ad libitum animals must be more prone to colon carcinogenesis than the calorie restricted animals, no carcinogenesis was found. In earlier studies, chemically induced colon carcinogenesis is enhanced, but not initiated, by dietary factors. It might be that no colon carcinogenesis initiating factor was present in these C57Bl/6 mice and that the mice were not prone to develop colon cancer spontaneously.

Item Type: Thesis (Master's Thesis / Essay)
Degree programme: Biology
Thesis type: Master's Thesis / Essay
Language: English
Date Deposited: 15 Feb 2018 07:57
Last Modified: 15 Feb 2018 07:57
URI: http://fse.studenttheses.ub.rug.nl/id/eprint/11883

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item