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The SWI/SNF complex a potential target against ovarian cancer

Heitink, L.S. (2014) The SWI/SNF complex a potential target against ovarian cancer. Bachelor's Thesis, Biology.

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Abstract

The switch/sucrose nonfermentable (SWI/SNF) complex is a chromatin remodeling complex with distinct functions regarding cellular fate and multicellular development. This complex consists of multiple protein subunits, of which some are mutually exclusive and could have opposite effects when incorporated into a complex. The SWI/SNF complex acts as a bona fide tumor suppressor. Mutations that lead to inactivation of the protein subunits BRG1 and AT-rich interacting domain containing protein 1A (ARID1A) have been linked to two types of ovarian cancer namely ovarian clear cell carcinoma and small cell carcinoma of the ovary (hypercalcemic type), respectively. These two types of ovarian cancer are one of the deadliest gynecological cancers and lack good treatment options. However, recent studies showed results, which can provide new treatment options for these two types of ovarian cancer. A synthetic lethal interaction is revealed because some cells, which harbor a mutation in one of the SWI/SNF subunits, are depending on the presence of other subunits for disturbed cell growth. These results are important for all cancers in general because in 20% of all the cancers, one or more mutations are found in one of the SWI/SNF subunits. This review will focus on the two types of ovarian cancer and possible new treatment options due to synthetic lethal interactions within the SWI/SNF complex will be discussed. Literature indicates that, inhibition of other pathways, like PI3K/AKT or MAPK pathways also has its effect on SWI/SNF subunits which can lead to alteration of SWI/SNF subunits expression or deactivation of the pathway in general.

Item Type: Thesis (Bachelor's Thesis)
Degree programme: Biology
Thesis type: Bachelor's Thesis
Language: English
Date Deposited: 15 Feb 2018 07:58
Last Modified: 15 Feb 2018 07:58
URI: http://fse.studenttheses.ub.rug.nl/id/eprint/12000

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