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Stress Gradient Hypothesis: do animals facilitate each other during stressful times?

Doornkamp, M. (2014) Stress Gradient Hypothesis: do animals facilitate each other during stressful times? Bachelor's Thesis, Biology.

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Abstract

Interactions among organisms can be a major force structuring biotic communities. The focus among biologists was long aimed at competition and negative interactions. Lately more evidence and attention are directed at facilitation and positive interactions. The Stress Gradient Hypothesis (SGH), which states that individuals will facilitate each other more under stressful situations, has been proven for plant-plant interactions. Is this theory also applicable to animals? To answer this question I’ve done a literature study. To help answer this question I’ve divided the animals into three groups: mollusks, arthropods and mammals. The articles found, provide evidence for the applicability of the SGH on mollusks. Evidence for arthropods and mammals is not as clear. The studies also have some concerns making them generally applicable. Thus I conclude that more and above all longer studies need to be done on this subject to provide unsurpassed evidence either in favor or against the applicability of the SGH on animals.

Item Type: Thesis (Bachelor's Thesis)
Degree programme: Biology
Thesis type: Bachelor's Thesis
Language: English
Date Deposited: 15 Feb 2018 07:58
Last Modified: 15 Feb 2018 07:58
URI: http://fse.studenttheses.ub.rug.nl/id/eprint/12059

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