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Amphiregulin producing ILC2s as a therapeutic target in allergic asthma: For better or for worse

Sinnema, N. (2015) Amphiregulin producing ILC2s as a therapeutic target in allergic asthma: For better or for worse. Master's Thesis / Essay, Biology.

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Abstract

Allergic asthma is a common disease characterized by mucus hyper secretion, eosinophil and mast cell recruitment, smooth muscle contraction and airway remodeling. Although allergic asthma was first described as a disease of the adaptive immune system, the focus nowadays is switched towards researching bronchial epithelial cells (BECs) and type 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s). The airway epithelium is the first barrier to allergens, and regulates further immune responses. ILC2s are stimulated by IL-33, IL-25 and TSLP produced by damaged airway epithelial cells, and play a role in inflammation and tissue repair. ILC2s have 2 main phenotypes, a pro-inflammatory phenotype mediated by the production of IL-5, IL-9 and IL-13 on one hand and a tissue repair phenotype mediated by amphiregulin on the other hand. A therapeutic intervention that induces a shift from the IL-5/IL-13 producing phenotype towards an amphiregulin producing phenotype might both inhibit inflammation and stimulate tissue repair in allergic asthma patients. This essay reviews the function of BECs, ILC2s, and amphiregulin in order to investigate whether amphiregulin producing ILCs could function as a new therapeutic target. In addition we will discuss whether more amphiregulin is beneficial for allergic asthma patients due to its role in tissue fibrosis and cancer.

Item Type: Thesis (Master's Thesis / Essay)
Degree programme: Biology
Thesis type: Master's Thesis / Essay
Language: English
Date Deposited: 15 Feb 2018 08:03
Last Modified: 15 Feb 2018 08:03
URI: http://fse.studenttheses.ub.rug.nl/id/eprint/12538

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