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Do sleep deprivation, time of day and sleep pressure influence nap efficiency?

Bosga, L. and Kantermann, T. (2015) Do sleep deprivation, time of day and sleep pressure influence nap efficiency? Bachelor's Thesis, Biology.

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Abstract

Reduced alertness and cognitive performance due to sleep deficiency is experienced by a substantial part of the general population, which can lead to serious accidents during commute or at work. When insufficient sleep is inevitable, napping might be useful to counteract reduced daytime alertness and cognitive performance. Naps of over 20 minutes are often used to counteract reduced alertness and cognitive performance, but these naps can result in sleep inertia. Sleep inertia is a transitional state of reduced arousal which can occur in the first 30 minutes after waking up. Sleep inertia is problematic when immediate alertness and cognitive performance is required after waking up. What influences efficiency of naps of 20 minutes or less, is not well documented. Therefore, lab-based studies that tested naps of 20 minutes or less in healthy adults were investigated for this thesis. Specifically, studies investigating napping protocols in the context of the three factors (i) prior sleep deprivation, (ii) time of day and (iii) prior wakefulness were reviewed. Prior sleep deprivation did not influence nap efficiency. Naps taken in the mid-afternoon showed significant benefits on alertness and cognitive performance. Napping seemed to be effective at noon, but only after a minimum of four to six hours of wakefulness.Napping seemed ineffective at 02:00 a.m. and 09:00 a.m. Naps of 20 minutes or less proved effective in reducing incidents in driving simulation tests and could also be assisting pilots in-flight. Future field research is needed, to assess the efficiency of naps of 20 minutes or less for those at high risk of reduced alertness and cognitive performance, e.g. pilots, surgeons and night-shift workers.

Item Type: Thesis (Bachelor's Thesis)
Degree programme: Biology
Thesis type: Bachelor's Thesis
Language: English
Date Deposited: 15 Feb 2018 08:10
Last Modified: 15 Feb 2018 08:10
URI: http://fse.studenttheses.ub.rug.nl/id/eprint/13630

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