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The non-flavonoid polyphenol resveratrol induces anti-obesity effects via SIRT1 dependent improved mitochondrial functioning

Otten, VE (2016) The non-flavonoid polyphenol resveratrol induces anti-obesity effects via SIRT1 dependent improved mitochondrial functioning. Bachelor's Thesis, Biology.

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Abstract

There is an urgent need for novel preventive and therapeutic strategies for the dramatically growing problem of obesity and related metabolic diseases. In this context, the non-flavonoid polyphenol resveratrol is of increasing interest for its suggested mimetic effect of calorie restriction (CR). This thesis will discuss the underlying mechanisms by which resveratrol induces anti-obesity effects, with the focus on sirtuin1 (SIRT1) dependent effects on mitochondrial functioning. Several studies indicate that resveratrol activates SIRT1, either directly or indirectly via AMPK, and subsequently increases PGC-1α protein levels. This pathway influences several metabolic processes in various tissues. The key themes discussed in this thesis are fatty acid oxidation, thermogenesis and mitochondrial biogenesis in rodents as well as in humans. In rodents, resveratrol treatment stimulates the enzymes CPT1, MCAD and LCAD leading to increased fatty acid oxidation. In addition, it increases energy dissipation via uncoupling proteins (UCPs) and induces mitochondrial biogenesis via increased levels of mTFA. However, human studies have shown contradictory results, which might be due to the use of sub-optimal doses. This indicates a need to understand the absorption pathway of resveratrol and gives abundant room for further research. Although this thesis focuses on a limited number of pathways affected by resveratrol, the findings already suggest a promising role of resveratrol in the treatment or prevention of obesity and related metabolic diseases.

Item Type: Thesis (Bachelor's Thesis)
Degree programme: Biology
Thesis type: Bachelor's Thesis
Language: English
Date Deposited: 15 Feb 2018 08:14
Last Modified: 15 Feb 2018 08:14
URI: http://fse.studenttheses.ub.rug.nl/id/eprint/14279

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