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Teaching a Complex Cognitive Skill Using an Educational Game: How non-game related design methods help structure educational game design

Bril, I. (2016) Teaching a Complex Cognitive Skill Using an Educational Game: How non-game related design methods help structure educational game design. Master's Thesis / Essay, Human-Machine Communication.

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Abstract

How does one teach a complex cognitive skill? Although there are several educational games whose aim is to teach these skills, there is little literature on how to teach it using an educational game. There are, however, several non-game related methods for teaching complex cognitive skills. These methods have been addressed as possible tools for educational game designers to use, yet have only received little attention. In this thesis, we will use two of these methods in combination to help formalize the design process of an educational game. A cognitive task analysis is combined with the four component instructional design method to explore a domain, identify a cognitive skill in need of training, construct a general training plan, and implement this by changing an existing game. Finally, we test to see whether playing the game causes participants to become better at the identified cognitive skill. To find out whether a complex cognitive skill is trained more effectively using feedback that is more steered towards reflection, two versions of the game were made: one with summative, non-reflective feedback and the other with formative reflection-inducing feedback. Results show that participants did not get better at the game and that there was no difference between the formative feedback group and the control group. The non-game related methods show promise for formalizing the design of educational games and are discussed thoroughly.

Item Type: Thesis (Master's Thesis / Essay)
Degree programme: Human-Machine Communication
Thesis type: Master's Thesis / Essay
Language: English
Date Deposited: 15 Feb 2018 08:26
Last Modified: 15 Feb 2018 08:26
URI: http://fse.studenttheses.ub.rug.nl/id/eprint/14730

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