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The effects of anthropogenic influence on soft sediment benthic macrofauna in the Dutch Wadden Sea and Oosterschelde (Eastern Scheldt).

Klerks, R.L. (2017) The effects of anthropogenic influence on soft sediment benthic macrofauna in the Dutch Wadden Sea and Oosterschelde (Eastern Scheldt). Master's Thesis / Essay, Marine Biology.

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Abstract

The Wadden Sea and the Eastern Scheldt are two unique Dutch National Parks placed under environmental monitoring by the Dutch Government. Historically both locations have proven to be of great economic value and over the years have been greatly impacted by anthropogenic use. More recent all large scale anthropogenic use (fishing, trawling) has been ceased while other impacts (power plant run-off, river run-off and dredging) are being closely monitored. Ecosystem succession (benthic filterfeeders  benthic depositfeeders) due to anthropogenic impacts are a large concern due to the effects on the trophic cascade. The decrease in primary production, biodiversity, abundance and even fish and bird presence have been reasons to limit human use of the areas. In order to establish methods of preservation and restoration of these historically important areas the causes and effects of the prolonged anthropogenic use needs to be studied. In order to formulate a plan that restores the areas previous wealth of biodiversity and abundance, starting with the group of ecosystem engineers known as infauna (soft sediment macrobenthic fauna), studies of all the interactions within this system should be combined for maximum effect.

Item Type: Thesis (Master's Thesis / Essay)
Degree programme: Marine Biology
Thesis type: Master's Thesis / Essay
Language: English
Date Deposited: 15 Feb 2018 08:28
Last Modified: 15 Feb 2018 08:28
URI: http://fse.studenttheses.ub.rug.nl/id/eprint/15187

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