Javascript must be enabled for the correct page display

New Developments in the Field of anti-PSMA Tracers for mCRPC and Bioanalysis of [68Ga]Ga-PSMA-11 in Human Plasma and Human liver and kidney microsomes

Kamp, J. (2017) New Developments in the Field of anti-PSMA Tracers for mCRPC and Bioanalysis of [68Ga]Ga-PSMA-11 in Human Plasma and Human liver and kidney microsomes. Master's Thesis / Essay, Biology.

[img]
Preview
Text
MasterLS_MPS_2017_JKamp.pdf - Published Version

Download (5MB) | Preview
[img] Text
toestemming.pdf - Other
Restricted to Backend only

Download (78kB)

Abstract

Although prostate cancer is a disease only seen in (elderly) men, it is responsible for a high disease burden on our society. In 2012, 1,1 million new cases were diagnosed worldwide and –despite several major advances in prostate cancer diagnosis, staging and therapy – an estimated 307 000 men died because of this disease worldwide in 2012. These numbers indicate the need for improved tools to battle prostate cancer. One of these tools is positron emission tomography (PET) combined with computed tomography (CT). PET/CT is a relatively new method that can be used for the diagnosis and staging of prostate cancer. This method relies on the accumulation of a radioactive tracer in target tissues, which can then be detected and localised with the PET scan. The combination of the PET with CT enables medical professionals to obtain detailed information about tumour location and/or staging. In this thesis, we will be discussing several of the most promising new developments in the field of radio tracers for prostate cancer and try to elucidate what makes these new developments different from the current gold standard for prostate cancer PET imaging: [68Ga]Ga-PSMA-11. The second chapter of this thesis will discuss several of the fist studies concerning the bioanalysis and metabolism of [68Ga]Ga-PSMA-11. This tracer was first described in 2012, after which it evolved ̶ only within a matter of years ̶ to become the gold standard for metastatic prostate cancer PET imaging. Eventually, the findings discussed in this thesis may serve as a basis for future studies, aimed at de-veloping new PET tracers for prostate cancer or studies that aim to increase our knowledge concerning tracer metabolism.

Item Type: Thesis (Master's Thesis / Essay)
Degree programme: Biology
Thesis type: Master's Thesis / Essay
Language: English
Date Deposited: 15 Feb 2018 08:32
Last Modified: 15 Feb 2018 08:32
URI: http://fse.studenttheses.ub.rug.nl/id/eprint/15849

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item