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Examining the Effects of Theory of Mind on playing the Game of ’No Thanks!’ using ACT-R-based Cognitive Models

Renkema, Tom (2018) Examining the Effects of Theory of Mind on playing the Game of ’No Thanks!’ using ACT-R-based Cognitive Models. Master's Thesis / Essay, Human-Machine Communication.

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Abstract

Theory of mind is the ability for an individual to reason about the mental state of themselves and others. This project studied the effects of theory of mind on playing the card game of No Thanks! using cognitive models. Multiple cognitive models using different orders of theory of mind were developed using instance-based decision making and a partial implementation of the cognitive architecture ACT-R. Additionally, the performance of these models against human players was examined. An iOS application was developed for the Apple iPad with which a user could play the game of No Thanks! against the developed cognitive models. Both an experiment with human subjects and simulations in which the models played one other were conducted. The results of both experiments showed that models using first-order or second-order theory of mind had a significant advantage over models using zero-order theory of mind. However, the advantage of using second-order theory of mind over first-order theory of mind appears to be not as substantial. Furthermore, this project demonstrated that an academic AI method like instance-based decision making is suitable for creating a competitive game AI for a competitive game.

Item Type: Thesis (Master's Thesis / Essay)
Supervisor:
Supervisor nameSupervisor E mail
Taatgen, N.A.N.A.Taatgen@rug.nl
Spenader, J.K.J.K.Spenader@rug.nl
Degree programme: Human-Machine Communication
Thesis type: Master's Thesis / Essay
Language: Dutch
Date Deposited: 29 Nov 2018
Last Modified: 03 Dec 2018 13:06
URI: http://fse.studenttheses.ub.rug.nl/id/eprint/18859

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