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Urban acoustic ecology: untangling the relative importance of phenotypic plasticity and developmental plasticity in response to anthropogenic noise

Bosma, Lies (2019) Urban acoustic ecology: untangling the relative importance of phenotypic plasticity and developmental plasticity in response to anthropogenic noise. Bachelor's Thesis, Biology.

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Abstract

Urbanization provides unique selection criteria on native flora and fauna. One of the factors with large impact is anthropogenic noise, which typically consists of low-frequency notes and which can have a masking effect on acoustic signalling of many animals for who these signals play an important role in mate attraction a reproduction and hostility behaviour. To colonize a city successfully, species have to possess certain characteristics in phenotype or behaviour to overcome this noise. In this paper I investigate whether changes in call or song in response to anthropogenic noise are due to phenotypic plasticity, developmental plasticity or a combination. Untangling the relative importance of developmental plasticity versus phenotypic plasticity for a species’ success in a given city will contribute to understanding how and why some species, but not others, are able to colonize and persist in urban environments There is a clear difference between taxa. Where most birds species respond to anthropogenic noise in a plastic, reversible way, frog and grasshopper species respond in a way that points to developmental plasticity. More species should be investigated to find out whether the found differences between taxa are consistent. Also, more research can be conducted on speciation and the influence of response to anthropogenic noise in this.

Item Type: Thesis (Bachelor's Thesis)
Supervisor:
Supervisor nameSupervisor E mail
Dietz, M.W.M.W.Dietz@rug.nl
Degree programme: Biology
Thesis type: Bachelor's Thesis
Language: English
Date Deposited: 22 May 2019
Last Modified: 22 May 2019 09:34
URI: http://fse.studenttheses.ub.rug.nl/id/eprint/19513

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