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The mechanism of neuroinvasive disease in West Nile virus infection

Schievink, B.H. (2009) The mechanism of neuroinvasive disease in West Nile virus infection. Bachelor's Thesis, Biology.

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Abstract

West Nile virus is a member of the flaviviridae family. It was first discovered in 1937 when it was isolated from blood of a febrile Ugandan woman. Since 1999, the virus has spread rapidly throughout the western hemisphere. Infection with West Nile virus often results in a fever. However, infection might also result in travelling of West Nile virus into the central nervous system and the brain, causing neuroinvasive disease. Infection might cause meningitis, encephalitis, poliomyelitis, chorioretinitis and has a high lethality. No specific treatment is available for West Nile virus infection. The mechanism by which the virus enters the central nervous system and the brain is not fully unraveled. Disruption of blood-brain barrier is important in causing neuroinvasive disease as well as travel of the virus into axons that lead to the central nervous system. Several factors modulate entry into the brain. Signaling of the tumor necrosis factor alpha receptor has shown to be a predominant factor in facilitating transport across the blood brain barrier. The aim of this review is to discuss the mechanism underlying neuroinvasive disease in West Nile virus infection.

Item Type: Thesis (Bachelor's Thesis)
Degree programme: Biology
Thesis type: Bachelor's Thesis
Language: English
Date Deposited: 15 Feb 2018 07:28
Last Modified: 15 Feb 2018 07:28
URI: http://fse.studenttheses.ub.rug.nl/id/eprint/8514

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