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Freezing Activity: The Target to Induce Cold-Ischemic Tolerance? ‘The Role of AMPK Agonists in Cold Preservation Related Organ Injury as Compared to Ischemic Preconditioning in Transplantation Medicine'

Ketelaar, M.E. (2009) Freezing Activity: The Target to Induce Cold-Ischemic Tolerance? ‘The Role of AMPK Agonists in Cold Preservation Related Organ Injury as Compared to Ischemic Preconditioning in Transplantation Medicine'. Bachelor's Thesis, Biology.

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Abstract

Abstract: Currently, in transplantation medicine an important risk factor for long-term graft rejection is cold-ischemia derived tissue-injury, occurring during prolonged organ preservation. The main consequences of cold-ischemia are ATP-depletion, inflammation and endothelial dysfunction. In recent decades growing attention has been paid to ischemic preconditioning (IP) as a phenomenon to induce cold-ischemia tolerance in organs. By exposing organs to a brief ischemic period before the prolonged cold-ischemic period, several protecting mechanisms are induced on the cellular level. The adenosine-monophosphate kinase (AMPK) has recently been discovered to play a central role in the IP mechanism. Therefore, in this review I outlined the similarities of the IP and AMPK effector mechanisms, thereby presenting a possible common way of action, but also outlining the AMPK specific role as regulator of metabolism. As several studies reveal an energy-saving, anti-inflammatory and indirect endothelium protecting effect of AMPK, targeting this kinase could be a promising strategy in future pharmacological preconditioning. Moreover, in this review I propose the AMPK-agonists AICAR and 5’AMP as possible candidates in the protection of organs against prolonged cold-ischemic preservation.

Item Type: Thesis (Bachelor's Thesis)
Degree programme: Biology
Thesis type: Bachelor's Thesis
Language: English
Date Deposited: 15 Feb 2018 07:28
Last Modified: 15 Feb 2018 07:28
URI: http://fse.studenttheses.ub.rug.nl/id/eprint/8556

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