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Optimization of sensor usage in net-centric operations

Ho, T.T.M. (2009) Optimization of sensor usage in net-centric operations. Master's Thesis / Essay, Computing Science.

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Abstract

In the military, joint and combined operations are quite common. Such operations may involve a great number of platforms working together, which, in general, means an even larger number of available resources (e.g. sensors and weapons). Because of the large scale and the available resources residing on different platforms, it is difficult for the platform operators to keep a good overview of the situation and to determine the best way to make use of their available resources to fulfill the mission. On behalf of the Royal Netherlands Navy, Thales Nederland is working on a Sensor Tasking Management (STM) system that is to manage all available sensors of the own force during an operation. Currently, a computer application is being developed that simulates this system. This thesis addresses the problem of finding the optimal sensor usage within the simulator system, where the notion of being optimal is actually not yet defined. Many different factors play a role here and there are basically infinitely many ways in which the available sensors can be deployed. Multicriteria decision making, in particular the multi-attribute utility theory, is used to determine the sensor usage in the STM-simulator. To keep it simple, only two dimensions are taken into account in the implementation. The idea stays the same, though. With this, even in relatively simple situations it may take too long to find the optimal sensor deployment. It is possible, however, to obtain results that come quite close to being optimal within a significantly smaller amount of time.

Item Type: Thesis (Master's Thesis / Essay)
Degree programme: Computing Science
Thesis type: Master's Thesis / Essay
Language: English
Date Deposited: 15 Feb 2018 07:28
Last Modified: 15 Feb 2018 07:28
URI: http://fse.studenttheses.ub.rug.nl/id/eprint/8578

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