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How will sea-level rise affect coastal habitats such as salt marshes in the long term?

Westveer, J. (2009) How will sea-level rise affect coastal habitats such as salt marshes in the long term? Bachelor's Thesis, Biology.

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Abstract

Coastal habitats such as salt marshes are flooded by the sea regularly. These land-water interactions have an effect on sedimentation, horizontal and vertical accretion, other geomorphologic features, and plant growth. Concerning the predicted sea-level rise, the question is: How will sea-level rise affect coastal habitats such as salt marshes in the long term? This subject has been studied worldwide and resulted in several models that are able to predict different aspects of the salt-marsh reaction to a rising sea level. The overall prediction is that salt marshes will be able to compensate for the general sea-level rise if they get enough inorganic sediment and/or organic matter supplied. Models from the US generally consider organic matter as an important factor, whereas the Northwest European models do not take this factor into account so much. When sediment accretion stops, the marsh is unable to grow and perhaps this will lead to a loss of salt-marsh area. This can be concluded from sea-edge erosion or cliff formation, and changes in the vegetation. For future management strategies the main goal is to prevent additional stress that can reduce the ability of wetlands to respond to climate change. The goal in Natura 2000, the general guideline for Dutch nature areas, is “maintain surface and improve quality” for the salt marshes in the Netherlands. Most salt marshes in the Netherlands can be found in the Wadden Sea and in the Delta area in Zealand. Differences lie mostly in the type of marsh soil.

Item Type: Thesis (Bachelor's Thesis)
Degree programme: Biology
Thesis type: Bachelor's Thesis
Language: English
Date Deposited: 15 Feb 2018 07:28
Last Modified: 15 Feb 2018 07:28
URI: http://fse.studenttheses.ub.rug.nl/id/eprint/8589

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