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Modeling and Managing Variability in Web Service-based Systems with UML and COVAMOF

Rossing, R. (2007) Modeling and Managing Variability in Web Service-based Systems with UML and COVAMOF. Master's Thesis / Essay, Computing Science.

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Abstract

Web services provide a standardized way of exchanging information between information systems. A Web service-based system is largely or entirely built on Web services. Variability is the ability of a software system to be extended, changed, customized or configured for use in a specific context. Explicit variability management in Web service-based systems is desirable because of their dynamic environment. COVAMOF is a framework to aid software engineers in the management of variability in software product families. It provides modeling facilities to model variability concepts over different layers of abstraction in a system. Earlier work has shown that COVAMOF can also be used for Web service-based systems. However, in that work variability was primarily defined on the implementation level. In our work, we take it a step further by modeling variability also in the architecture of Web service-based systems. We have developed a profile for the Unified Modeling Language (UML) for modeling variability in Web servicebased systems at the architectural level. This UML profile is compatible with the COVAMOF framework. We have also extended the COVAMOF-VS tool suite, to allow it to view and configure the variability in a Web service-based system. Furthermore, to manage the variability in Web service-based systems at runtime, we have developed a variability management process that requires only minimal involvement from the end-user. This management process is driven from the COVAMOF-VS tool suite, and uses our architectural variability modeling approach.

Item Type: Thesis (Master's Thesis / Essay)
Degree programme: Computing Science
Thesis type: Master's Thesis / Essay
Language: English
Date Deposited: 15 Feb 2018 07:30
Last Modified: 15 Feb 2018 07:30
URI: http://fse.studenttheses.ub.rug.nl/id/eprint/8964

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