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Activation and localization of the emotional circuits in the brain: an fMRI study in patients with schizophrenia and healthy volunteers

Balen, L. van (2005) Activation and localization of the emotional circuits in the brain: an fMRI study in patients with schizophrenia and healthy volunteers. Master's Thesis / Essay, Artificial Intelligence.

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Abstract

The evolutionary survival of a species is dependent on individual organisms quickly detecting environmental threats and rapidly initiating defensive behavioral reactions. This graduation project investigated the perception of stimuli with different degrees of biological relevance, i.e. fearful faces (signalling an immediate threat), neutral faces (not signalling a threat), and houses (providing no information about either the presence or absence of environmental threats). Brain structures involved in the perception of these stimuli were investigated with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fivIRl). In addition to healthy subjects, facial affect processing was examined in schizophrenia patients. Because it is believed that schizophrenia patients are impaired in facial affect recognition, it was investigated whether or not they would show differential brain activation (compared to healthy subjects) during the perception of fearful faces, neutral faces and houses. Subjects were presented with images of visual noise, from which a stimulus (fearful face, neutral face or house) gradually emerged. The moment of stimulus recognition was indicated with a button press. Brain activation during the task was measured with functional resonance imaging (fMRI).

Item Type: Thesis (Master's Thesis / Essay)
Degree programme: Artificial Intelligence
Thesis type: Master's Thesis / Essay
Language: English
Date Deposited: 15 Feb 2018 07:30
Last Modified: 15 Feb 2018 07:30
URI: http://fse.studenttheses.ub.rug.nl/id/eprint/8971

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