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How to link a burrow to its inhabitant: A classiflcation model for thalassinidean shrimps using the morphology of their burrows

Troost, K. (2001) How to link a burrow to its inhabitant: A classiflcation model for thalassinidean shrimps using the morphology of their burrows. Master's Thesis / Essay, Biology.

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Abstract

Thalassinidean shrimps are common burrowers in marine and estuarine sediments. Their burrows can vary from simple to very complex and from a few centimetres to a few metres in depth. These shrimps are thought to deposit feed, to filter feed and to scavenge or even cultivate micro-organisms on organic debris for consumption, depending on the species that is dealt with. It is generally believed that the morphology of a burrow reflects the feeding strategy of the inhabitant shrimp. With that in mind, a few models have been constructed in the past that classified the shrimps into trophic categories using the morphology of their burrows. Although a large variety of burrow systems is known nowadays thanks to the relatively new resin casting technique, few is known about the inhabiting animals since they often manage to escape before the researchers have even laid their eyes on these elusive animals. In this thesis, a model is presented that not only classifies the shrimps into trophic categories, but that also makes it possible to identify a shrimp without even having to look at the animal itself. Like in the earlier models, shrimps were classified according to their burrow characteristics. This time, however, the classification was based on a cluster analysis in stead of assumptions regarding the importance of different characteristics. Therefore, the model presented here is believed to be less biased than the earlier models and because of that, more reliable.

Item Type: Thesis (Master's Thesis / Essay)
Degree programme: Biology
Thesis type: Master's Thesis / Essay
Language: English
Date Deposited: 15 Feb 2018 07:31
Last Modified: 15 Feb 2018 07:31
URI: http://fse.studenttheses.ub.rug.nl/id/eprint/9205

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