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Wear In Total Joint Replacements: Characteristics and biological activity of wear debris from different materials

Keijzer, L.E. (2010) Wear In Total Joint Replacements: Characteristics and biological activity of wear debris from different materials. Bachelor's Thesis, Biology.

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Abstract

In all total joint replacements, at the articulating surfaces, wear particles are generated. Prostheses can be made from different materials, resulting in wear debris with distinctive characteristics. In comparison to metal or ceramic prostheses, polyethylene (UHMWPE) artificial joints produce a huge amount of wear debris (40-90 mm3 per year compared to 0.1-3 mm3 per year). Cross-linking the polyethylene acetabular cups reduces this amount to almost a fifth (7-20 mm3 per year) but still too much wear debris is generated. The body responses to these wear particles by inducing a chronic foreign body reaction. After macrophages phagocytose polyethylene particles, they become activated and start releasing chemokines. As a result, osteoclasts become more active, reabsorp more bone and the prosthesis fails due to aseptic loosening. Metal wear particles are nanometer sized (1-40 nm) and much smaller than polyethylene particles (0.1-1 μm). Ceramic particles are also nanometer sized but a small part of the particles is larger. Because their small sizes metal and ceramic particles can easily penetrate and harm cells. They can even enter the nucleus and damage DNA. Hypersensitivity and corrosion are other problems of metal joint prostheses. The distinct characteristics of the wear particles from different materials evoke unique responses from the body. Knowing these characteristics and the biological activity they induce is thus essential.

Item Type: Thesis (Bachelor's Thesis)
Degree programme: Biology
Thesis type: Bachelor's Thesis
Language: English
Date Deposited: 15 Feb 2018 07:44
Last Modified: 15 Feb 2018 07:44
URI: http://fse.studenttheses.ub.rug.nl/id/eprint/9342

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