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Some considerations involving feeding of 3 species of Carcharhinid sharks

Besten, A.Y. den (1999) Some considerations involving feeding of 3 species of Carcharhinid sharks. Master's Thesis / Essay, Biology.

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Abstract

Diet is an important factor in keeping captive sharks alive. If not all necessary nutritional components such as proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, vitamins and trace elements are available to the shark in adequate amounts, deficiencies can occur that can lead to diseases, growth disorders or even death. It is essential that sharks will be fed a varied diet consisting of different species of fish and a multivitamin tablet. Of course not only the quality but also the quantity of food is essential to maintain the health of captive sharks. As example two different calculations for amount of food in % body weight (BW) per week is made. It appears that a sandbar shark, Carcharhinus plumbeus, of 34.0 kg should eat about 6% BW. These calculations are based upon the assumption that the growth rate is stable throughout the life of a shark and the weight of the shark is known. The weight of a shark can be estimated as is shown in several diagrams that show weight versus length or weight versus age curves. Also the assumption of stable growth is discussed since there seem to be growth stages throughout the life of a shark. A factor that also plays a role in the amount of food needed by a shark is the metabolic efficiency which is influenced by its own factors such as glide/rest period, gastric evacuation rate and total gut passage time and absorption efficiency. This paper is concluded with an overview of known feeding schedules and a brief conclusion.

Item Type: Thesis (Master's Thesis / Essay)
Degree programme: Biology
Thesis type: Master's Thesis / Essay
Language: English
Date Deposited: 15 Feb 2018 07:44
Last Modified: 15 Feb 2018 07:44
URI: http://fse.studenttheses.ub.rug.nl/id/eprint/9427

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