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The use of monoclonal antibodies in near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) tumour targeted (intraoperative) imaging

Bosch, T.F.H. van den (2011) The use of monoclonal antibodies in near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) tumour targeted (intraoperative) imaging. Bachelor's Thesis, Biology.

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Abstract

The development of monoclonal antibodies has been very important in applied immunology. They have found a broad variety of applications. One such application lies within (intraoperative) imaging of cancer. Specifically, antibody targeted near infrared fluorescence (NIRF) intraoperative imaging of cancer is an important and very promising novel approach with respect to cancer treatment. In this literature study, it is outlined what investigations have currently been performed using antibody targeted NIRF (intraoperative) imaging of cancer. Other approaches to NIRF labelling in tumour targeted (optical) imaging are also discussed and compared to the antibody targeted technique. Finally, it is discussed which approach will have the better prospects of clinical application for (intraoperative) imaging in cancer therapy. The study concludes that targeted imaging of cancer using NIRF antibodies has the important advantage over non targeted NIRF cancer imaging techniques of specifity for the tumour. However, whether the technique will actually aid in cancer therapy still remains to be seen. Many further (clinical) studies will be required in order to determine whether the technique can truly assist in cancer treatment. Furtermore, important developments have been achieved in ‘smart activatable probes’. These labeling agents are specifically activated by tumour enzymes (upon cleavage). These ‘smart activatable probes’ are not necessarily antibody targeted but may also be peptide based.

Item Type: Thesis (Bachelor's Thesis)
Degree programme: Biology
Thesis type: Bachelor's Thesis
Language: English
Date Deposited: 15 Feb 2018 07:45
Last Modified: 15 Feb 2018 07:45
URI: http://fse.studenttheses.ub.rug.nl/id/eprint/9517

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