Javascript must be enabled for the correct page display

Associations between metabolic syndrome, immune dysregulation and cognitive functioning in bipolar disorder.

Kroll, FF (2020) Associations between metabolic syndrome, immune dysregulation and cognitive functioning in bipolar disorder. Research Project 1 (minor thesis), Behavioural and Cognitive Neurosciences.

[img]
Preview
Text
mBCN_2020_KrollFF.pdf

Download (402kB) | Preview
[img] Text
toestemming.pdf
Restricted to Registered users only

Download (112kB)

Abstract

Bipolar disorder (BD) patients do not only suffer from mood symptoms but also show a variety of neurocognitive deficits in attention, memory, learning and social cognition. Many patients suffering from the disease do not benefit adequately from currently available treatment options and quality of life is often low. A possible way of improving cognitive impairments would be to treat prevalent inflammatory comorbidities, specifically metabolic syndrome and autoimmune disease, that may aggravate BD symptoms. The study population was provided by the Lifelines cohort study and included 494 adult BD subjects and 494 age-, sex- and education-matched controls with no psychiatric diagnoses. Metabolic syndrome was assessed based on the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III guidelines and autoimmune disease was defined by the American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association. Cognitive performance was tested using the Mini-Mental State Exam, the CogState Brief Battery and the Ruff Figural Fluency Test. Indeed, the prevalence of both metabolic syndrome and autoimmune disorder is higher in the BD group compared to the controls. However, having a comorbidity did not significantly impair cognitive performance of the BD subjects. Nevertheless, BD patients should be screened for autoimmune disorder and metabolic syndrome regardless of its effects on cognitive performance to ensure the best possible treatment and highest quality of life outcomes.

Item Type: Thesis (Research Project 1 (minor thesis))
Supervisor name: Haarman, B.C.M.
Degree programme: Behavioural and Cognitive Neurosciences
Thesis type: Research Project 1 (minor thesis)
Language: English
Date Deposited: 10 Jul 2020 09:58
Last Modified: 10 Jul 2020 09:58
URI: http://fse.studenttheses.ub.rug.nl/id/eprint/22533

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item